Square Foot Gardening Chart – Spacing Guide By Vegetable (2024)

(Last Updated On: December 22, 2023)

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Why Use a Square Foot Garden Layout?

First, start building a square foot garden template

Square Foot Gardening Chart By Vegetable

Blueberries and Raspberries: Spacing and Placement

Planning Ahead By Creating A Garden Layout Plan

Converting Seed Packet Plant Spacing to Square Foot Plant Spacing

Seed Packet Plant Spacing to Square Foot Plant Spacing Calculator

Plan My Garden Square Foot Gardening Planner

See How Plan My Garden – Square Foot Garden Planner Works

Bookmark This Page!

Square Foot Gardening Spacing FAQ

Why Use a Square Foot Garden Layout?

The square foot gardening layout is a popular method of organizing a vegetable garden because it allows you to maximize the space you have available. By dividing your garden into small, one-foot squares and carefully planning which plants go in each square, you can fit a larger number of plants into a smaller area by following guidelines in the square foot gardening chart below. This is especially useful if you have limited space for a garden, such as a small backyard or a balcony or just looking to maximize yields.

Using a square foot gardening layout also helps you to plant and grow different vegetables together in a way that maximizes their growth and productivity. By following the recommended plant spacing guidelines in the square foot gardening chart below, you can ensure that your plants have enough room to grow and thrive without overcrowding each other.

Overall, the square foot gardening layout is a great way to efficiently and effectively use your gardening space to grow a variety of vegetables. So, it is a highly recommended method for those who want to grow a large amount of food in a small area.

First, start building a square foot garden template

First, divide your garden into 1-foot squares. This can be done by drawing lines in the soil with a rake or using strings are guides. In the example below we divided up the 4′ X 8′ raised bed, into 32 garden squares with string. This produces a square foot garden template to begin working with. This creates a grid that allows you to easily plan and plant your garden, ensuring that each square foot is used efficiently. Finally, After building the template, you can then decide which vegetables or plants you want to grow in each square and plant by making a placement plan according to the square foot gardening chart below. Square foot gardening is a great way to maximize the space in your garden and ensure that you are growing a diverse and abundant harvest.

Square Foot Gardening Chart – Spacing Guide By Vegetable (1)

Next, plants are sown or transplanted into each 1×1 square in multiples of 1, 2, 4, 9, or 16 depending on the crop.

See the square foot planting placement example below.

Square Foot Gardening Chart – Spacing Guide By Vegetable (2)

Last, there are some vegetables that take up a lot of space like pumpkins for example. Those will require at least 4 squares for 1 plant and should be trained outside of the growing area. Tomatoes on the other hand could be pruned and grown vertically as close as 1 square foot, however allowing for 1 per every 4 squares is best. I have added those details in the square foot gardening chart below.

Need help planning your square foot garden? Try Plan My Garden Square foot gardening planner now for only $29! With our easy-to-use online planner, you can create a custom garden plan in just minutes. Simply enter your zip code, draw your desired layout, and select the vegetables you want to grow and how much.

Within 24 hours we send you an email with PDF printable plans. A custom visual planting schedule, a getting started guide, grow guides for each vegetable, and a custom plant layout and spacing for your square foot garden.

Don’t wait any longer to start your gardening journey – get your personalized square foot garden plan today with Plan My Garden!

Try Plan My Garden Now

Square Foot Gardening Chart By Vegetable

Below is a square-foot garden layout chart of popular plants and their optimal planting spacing. Use this square foot gardening chart as a plant spacing guide for your square foot garden.

Vegetable TypeSpacing Per SquareVegetable TypeSpacing Per Square
Artichoke 1 per 4 squaresOregano1
Arugula4Parsley4
Asian Greens4Parsnips9
Basil2-4Peanuts1
Beans (bush)9Peas9
Beets9Peppers (Bell)1
Bok Choy (baby)9Peppers (All Others)1
Broccoli1Potatoes4
Broccoli Rabe1Pumpkins1 per 4 squares
Brussel Sprout1Quinoa4
Cabbage1Radicchio2
Cantaloupe1 per 4 squaresRadishes16
Carrots16Rhubarb1
Cauliflower1Rosemary1
Celery4Rutabagas4
Celtuce2Sage1
Chives4Scallions16
Cilantro1-9Shallots4
Collards1Sorrel2
Corn4Spinach9
Cucumbers2Squash1 per 4 squares
Dill2Strawberry1-4
Eggplant1Swiss Chard4
Endive4Tarragon1
Fennel4Tomatoes1 per 4 squares
French Sorrel4-9Turnips9
Garlic4Thyme4
Green Onions16Wasabi1
Kale1Watercress1
Kohlrabi4Watermelon1 per 4 squares
Leeks9Yams4
Lettuce (leaf)6Zucchini1 per 4 squares
Lettuce (head)2BlueberriesNA (See Below)
Melons1 per 4 squaresRaspberriesNA (See Below)
Mint1-4
Onions (bunching)16
Onions Large9

Blueberries and Raspberries: Spacing and Placement

While square foot gardening is a great way to maximize the yield of your vegetable garden, some plants, like blueberries and raspberries, require more space and a different approach to planting.

When it comes to blueberries, they need at least 3 feet of space between each plant to grow and produce fruit. Moreover, blueberries require acidic soil with a pH between 4.5 and 5.5, which may not be compatible with the soil in your vegetable garden. Therefore, it’s best to plant blueberries in their own separate space, either in containers or a dedicated patch in your yard.

As for raspberries, they also need about 2-3 feet of space between each plant, as they can spread and produce suckers. However, unlike blueberries, raspberries are more adaptable to different soil types and pH levels. Nonetheless, it’s still recommended to plant raspberries in their own area, preferably with a trellis or support system to help them grow vertically and avoid crowding.

In summary, while blueberries and raspberries can be a delicious addition to your garden, they require a different approach to planting and spacing compared to vegetables and other plants. Make sure to give them plenty of room to grow and expand, and consider planting them outside of your vegetable garden area for optimal results.

Planning Ahead By Creating A Garden Layout Plan

Planning your garden layout can be a daunting task, especially if you are new to gardening. However, with a little bit of planning and organization, you can easily create a beautiful and productive garden.

One important aspect to consider when designing your garden layout is the amount of space required by each plant. By using this square foot gardening chart above, you can determine the exact amount of space needed for each type of vegetable. This helps you to maximize your garden space and ensure that all plants have enough room to grow and thrive.

Another important factor to consider is the placement of larger plants in relation to smaller ones. You want to avoid having larger plants shade out smaller ones, so it’s important to position them in such a way that allows for plenty of sunlight to reach all parts of the garden. Our Plan My Garden square foot gardening planner helps with this by suggesting the best placement for larger vegetables in the north and east sections of the beds, and placing larger plants at the edges of the beds so they can sprawl out.

By taking the time to carefully plan your garden layout, you can create a beautiful and productive garden that will provide you with a bounty of fresh vegetables all season long. And with our square foot gardening planner, Plan My Garden you can easily create your custom garden layout plan for only $29. Don’t wait any longer to start your gardening journey – get your personalized square foot garden plan today!”

Square Foot Gardening Chart – Spacing Guide By Vegetable (3)

Try Plan My Garden Now

Converting Seed Packet Plant Spacing to Square Foot Plant Spacing

To calculate the number of plants that can fit in each square foot of your garden, refer to the seed packet for the recommended plant spacing. This information can be found on the back of the packet and will tell you the distance between plants within a row. Simply disregard the row spacing and focus on the plant spacing.

To calculate the number of plants per square foot in your garden, use this formula:

(Planting area length / Plant spacing) * (Planting area width / Plant spacing) / Number of square feet in planting area = Total number of plants per square foot

For a simple example, of a 1 square foot planting area and the recommended plant spacing is 3 inches, the calculation would be:

(12 inches / 3 inches) * (12 inches / 3 inches) / 1 square foot = 16 plants per square foot

You can simply replace the planting area length and width with your own values, and the plant spacing with the recommended value from your seed packet.

Lastly, don’t worry, you don’t have to do the math yourself. See the quick reference below or use our seed packet square foot spacing calculator below.

If the Seed Packet Recommends Plant Spacing Of:

  • 3 inches, you can fit 16 plants in each square foot.
  • 4 inches, you can fit 9 plants in each square foot.
  • 6 inches, you can fit 4 plants per square foot.
  • 12 inches, you can fit 1 plant per square foot.

Seed Packet Plant Spacing to Square Foot Plant Spacing Calculator

To calculate the number of plants per square foot in your garden, use this simple calculator. Just enter the recommended plant spacing from your seed packet, and the calculator will do the rest!

Plan My Garden Square Foot Gardening Planner

Are you ready to start your square foot garden?

Let us help you plan it efficiently and effectively with our square foot gardening planner, Plan My Garden!

Simply enter your zip code, draw your desired layout, and select the vegetables you want to grow.

For a one-time fee of $39, you can get a customized square foot garden plan using Plan My Garden and get started on your gardening journey with ease! You’ll receive a custom visual planting schedule, a getting started guide, grow guides for each vegetable and a custom plant layout for your square foot garden.

Don’t wait any longer to start your gardening journey – learn how to get your personalized square foot garden plan today with plan my garden!

Try Plan My Garden Now

See How Plan My Garden – Square Foot Garden Planner Works

Bookmark This Page!

You’ll find yourself wanting to reference this chart through the growing season – don’t forget to bookmark this page! Finally, check out our handy seed germination temperature chart.

Square Foot Gardening Spacing FAQ

Q: What is a square foot garden layout?

A: A square foot garden layout is a way of organizing a garden by dividing it into small, evenly spaced squares, each representing one square foot of space.

Q: Why should I use a square foot garden layout?

A: Square foot garden layouts are useful for maximizing space and maximizing yields in small garden spaces. They also make it easier to plan and organize a garden, as you can easily see how much space each plant will need.

Q: How do I start building a square foot garden template?

A: To start building a square foot garden template, divide your garden into 1-foot squares using either a rake or strings as guides.

Q: How do I use the square foot gardening layout chart by vegetable?

A: To use the square foot gardening layout chart by vegetable, simply look up the vegetable you want to plant and follow the recommended spacing guidelines. This will help you plan out your garden and ensure that each plant has enough space to grow.

Q: How do I plan ahead by creating a garden layout plan?

A: To plan ahead by creating a garden layout plan, first identify all the garden space you have and map out how much space you have and where to position each vegetable. Consider the size and growth habits of each plant to ensure that larger plants don’t shade out smaller ones.

Q: How can I easily plan my square foot garden?

A: To easily plan your square foot garden use a square foot gardening planner like Plan My Garden. Simply enter your zip code, draw your layout, and enter the plants you want to grow. Plan My Garden will send you a custom visual schedule, a getting started guide, grow guide for each vegetable, and a custom plant layout for your square foot garden.

Q. How do you calculate plants per square foot?

(Planting area length / Plant spacing) * (Planting area width / Plant spacing) / Number of square feet in planting area = Total number of plants per square foot. Use our Seed Packet Square Foot Spacing Calculator to make things simple.

How many plants can you plant in a square foot garden?

The number of plants you can plant in a square foot garden will depend on the type of plants you are growing and the spacing between them – you can typically place 1, 2, 4, 8, 9, or 16 plants per square foot. Use this square-foot gardening chart above for each specific vegetable.

Is Square Foot Gardening Worth It?

Yes, Square foot gardening can be worth it, it is an effective way to maximize the output you can provide in a garden space and make planning much easier. It is also an easy way to keep your garden organized and make sure everything is planted in the right place.

What is Plan My Garden?

Plan My Garden is a square foot gardening planner that helps users efficiently plan and design their garden layout. It provides custom visual planting schedules, a getting started guide, grow guides for each vegetable, and a custom plant layout for square foot gardening. It costs $29 for a personalized garden plan.

24 Responses

  1. What about climbing beans? Thanks for your help!

    Reply

    1. Hi Meagan! Climbing beans are 9 per square feet around the pole or climbing structure in your square foot garden! Happy Growing -Tim

      Reply

  2. used to watch on tv years ago wish they would bring it back

    Reply

  3. I don’t see Edamame on this list (will be growing one called Karikachi Edamame)

    Reply

    1. Hi Shirley! I would say 4-9 similar to bush beans. I will update the list! Happy growing!

      Reply

  4. I get the number of plants per square foot but is there a particular layout to use? Like if I am planting broccoli, caulifower, bush beans, radishes, carrots, etc. Are there guidelines as to what to plant next to each other or on the north side? South side? In the middle?

    Reply

    1. If your planting in a small place, the best thing to keep in mind is the height of the plants. Plants that are going to be trellised, plant on the north and west side so they don’t shade. Then keep taller plants on the north and west side and smaller plants on the south and east side. In our custom garden plans, plant heights are automatically taken into account based on thee garden layout. – https://organicbackyardgardening.com/planmygarden

      Reply

  5. I just prepped a 16’x 32′ garden space. Can this same concept be applied using sq. ft method leaving space between the different veggies to move thru? Also , I wanted to grow corn , and was thinking of utilizing 4′ x 16′. Using this method would that be too dense? Thank you!

    Reply

    1. Yes! You can section of square foot sections between the walkways. You can certainly grow corn in a in the 4’x16′ space – that should give you 256 plants at 4 per square foot – I would highly recommend making sure that soil is amended with fresh compost or manure as corn is a heavy feeder.

      Reply

  6. I haven’t grown any summer squashes since moving to square foot and eathbox gardening. Thank you for showing me I don’t have to use my earthbox & can make use of vertical gardening.

    Reply

  7. Thank you for the quick reference! Just adding a few more herbs and vegetables and was happy to find them in this list.

    Reply

    1. Hi Mary Ann! So happy I was able to help! Thank you for checking out this square foot guide! – Tim

      Reply

  8. Greetings! This is my first comment here
    so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and tell
    you I really enjoy reading through your articles.
    Can you recommend any other blogs/websites/forums that cover the same
    topics? Thank you so much!

    Reply

    1. I like the idea of collaborating to celebrate each other! I’d be interested in making a mutually enjoyable relationship with Admin of Organic Backyard Gardening. I am a huge fan of square foot gardening and I am featuring this style of gardening in one chapter of my new book. I love that you have the software to help people to plan out their space and would love to feature that in my book. Please reach out if you are interested!! HAPPY GARDENING!

      Reply

      1. Hi Jo Ann, Thanks for the comment and gald we connected via email – looking forward to further discussing! Cheers, Tim

        Reply

  9. Thanks. this was just the information I needed.

    Reply

  10. how do you suggest doing okra

    Reply

    1. 1 or 2 per square. I have updated the list! 🙂

      Reply

  11. Thanks for discussing the following wonderful subject matter on your website. I noticed it on the search engines. I am going to check back again when you post additional aricles.

    Reply

  12. Thanks so much for this great information!!

    Reply

    1. No problem! So glad you liked it! 🙂

      Reply

  13. You forgot onions in your list.

    Reply

    1. Hey Dale,
      Hope all is well for Large bulbing onions, they can be planted 9 per square foot. Scallions and Green Onion types can be planted 16 per sq foot. I have updated the square foot gardening guide above.

      Reply

      1. Thanks for adding some of the onions – you still forgot onions 🙂 No regular bulb onions. Large bulbs at 4 per square and smaller bulbs at 9 per square. I’m going to just go with 4.

        Reply

Square Foot Gardening Chart – Spacing Guide By Vegetable (2024)

FAQs

Square Foot Gardening Chart – Spacing Guide By Vegetable? ›

Plant Your Favorite Veggies

If you're building more than one raised square-foot garden bed, leave enough space between them to roll a wheelbarrow. The formula for planting is simple: one extra-large plant per 1x1-foot square; four large plants per square; nine medium plants per square; and 16 small plants per square.

How many vegetables to plant per square foot? ›

Plant Your Favorite Veggies

If you're building more than one raised square-foot garden bed, leave enough space between them to roll a wheelbarrow. The formula for planting is simple: one extra-large plant per 1x1-foot square; four large plants per square; nine medium plants per square; and 16 small plants per square.

How do I plan my vegetable garden layout? ›

As a general rule, put tall veggies toward the back of the bed, mid-sized ones in the middle, and smaller plants in the front or as a border. Consider adding pollinator plants to attract beneficial insects that can not only help you get a better harvest, but will also prey on garden pests.

What is a square foot vegetable garden layout? ›

Grid Gardening

A square foot garden can be thought of as a grid. For example – a raised bed that is 4 feet by 4 feet would have 16 square feet. With square foot gardening you could plant 16 different vegetables if you wanted, one in each square. Or you could have 16 squares of the same vegetable.

How to calculate plant spacing? ›

For a square bed, multiply the length of the bed by its width to determine how many plants per square foot. For a circular planting bed, you can calculate how many plants per square foot is ideal by multiplying 3.14 by the distance from the center to the edge of the bed.

What is the spacing for tomato plants? ›

In Ground: If you're planting directly in the ground, you may have more space and be planting in rows. In that case, space your tomatoes 18-24 inches apart along a row, but space your rows about 36 inches apart. This will leave enough room for you to work between rows.

What are the rules for square foot gardening? ›

To better use all the space, he recommended planting by squares one foot (30 cm) long and wide. Thus “square foot gardening.” Each square would contain 1 extra–large vegetable, 4 large ones, 9 medium ones and 16 small ones.

What vegetables to plant together chart? ›

Vegetables and Herbs Companion Planting Chart
PlantGood Together
PotatoBush Bean, Cabbage, Carrot, Corn, Horseradish, Onion, Parsnip, Peas
RadishBeet, Bush Beans, Pole Beans, Carrots, Cucumber, Lettuce, Parsnip, Peas, Spinach, Squash
SpinachCelery, Corn, Eggplant, Cauliflower
SquashCorn, Onion, Radish
15 more rows

How many tomato plants per square foot garden? ›

SFG recommends planting one indeterminate tomato per square in the grid. We're assuming you're attaching your trellis to the north end of your raised bed and that the tomato is planted in those adjacent squares.

What is the most efficient vegetable garden layout? ›

Square foot gardening is an efficient and space-saving technique that involves dividing your garden into small, manageable squares. Each square is typically one foot by one foot and is planted with a specific number of plants depending on their size.

How to make a square foot garden grid? ›

A popular method involves placing stakes or screws at one foot intervals around your bed and using tomato twine to act as the visual divider. This method is especially useful if you plan on removing the grid later on in the growing season.

How do I choose a garden layout? ›

Your garden layout should be planned based on factors including location, sun exposure, and the types of plants you'd like to grow. You'll plan the size and type of beds according to whether it's a vegetable garden, herb garden, flower garden, or a low maintenance spaced primarily designed as an outdoor living area.

How many zucchini plants per square foot? ›

1, plant per 1 square foot is very tight). Second Sow seeds or transplant about 3 inches away from the stake on the south side of the stake. Once the seedlings come up, mulch the Zucchini plant with wood mulch or dead leaves. The last step is to remember to harvest frequently.

How far apart should I plant cucumbers? ›

Quick Guide to Growing Cucumbers

Plant cucumbers when average daily temperatures reach the mid-70s° F. Space cucumbers 36 to 60 inches apart (12 inches apart for trellised plants) in an area with abundant sun and fertile, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.0 to 6.8.

How far apart should I plant peppers? ›

Set pepper plant seedlings out after the last spring frost. They grow well in raised beds, containers, and in-ground gardens. Plant them 18 to 24 inches apart in a sunny, well-drained spot. Pepper plants need at least 6-8 hours of sunlight per day.

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